Drama and English Literature BA(Hons) 2017-18

This course also available for 2018-19 entry

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Florence Maclennan

Flo talks about her time at University

About the course

This course offers you the opportunity to study a contemporary drama curriculum with great breadth and depth, alongside English Literature.

The wide range of production activity means you can constantly be involved in staff and student-led performances.You'll also have the opportunity to work with internationally renowned theatre companies, which in recent years have included Slung Low, IOU Productions and Northern Broadsides, and practitioners such as Professor Sir Patrick Stewart, John Britton, Andrew Morrish and Nicolás Núñez who have previously visited the department.

We are focused on helping you to develop your own individual creativity and to understand how to use that to produce intelligent, thoughtful and innovative work. If you have a set of principles and approaches to work that you believe in and understand, then we'll support you in using these through your creative development, both practically and intellectually. Our innovative approach will let you develop as you need to, to fulfil your own potential.

In the National Student Satisfaction Survey 2016, Drama scored 93% for overall student satisfaction. and English scored 92%, ranking us the best in Yorkshire.

The English Literature component of the course is structured in a way that enables you to acquire and develop knowledge, skills and abilities across all levels of the degree by being taught explicitly within the modules via lectures, workshops and seminars.

Your English Literature module tutors are published authors and recognised as leading researchers in their fields of expertise. 86.9% of their work submitted for the last Research Assessment Exercise was rated ‘world leading' or ‘internationally significant'.

See what current Drama student Flo has to say about her course.

See what current English Literature student Sarah has to say about her course.

Course scholarships available – up to £3000. More details.


UCAS code:
W402

Start date:
18 / 09 / 2017

Duration:

3 years full-time
4 years inc. placement year

Course type:

Full Time inc. placement year

Course content

You'll have the opportunity to be fully involved in theatre production throughout the course, in a stimulating culture of hard work, creativity, collaboration, investigation and exploration. Two of our theatre spaces are venues for nationally touring theatre/performance companies, and the rich performance culture of Leeds, Manchester and the surrounding area is easily accessible.

In English you'll be supported in developing your analytical abilities and creative and interpretative skills, using a range of literary or linguistic approaches to texts and interaction.

Year 1

Drama

Option modules:

Choose two from a list which may include-

Models and Theories of Performance Practice 1B

This weekly workshop/lecture/seminar introduces you to a range of historical performance practices from the late-Victorian period to the present. The seminars are designed to encourage you to probe and debate the issues raised with reference to texts taken from a range of cultures and periods. Each week you will be asked to examine theatrical play texts and performances in historical context using theories of performance. You will have the opportunity to gain insight into how conceptions of character and plot converge and/or diverge over time and explore how social, political, and artistic ideas have affected theatre over time. The assessment of this module is based entirely on coursework consisting of written and presentational assignments.


Text into Performance

You’ll have the opportunity to explore the ways in which a play script can form the basis for a live theatre production through working together as a company to stage a short text. Questions of character, structure, meaning and dramaturgy can be explored through the challenge of staging the work. Assessment takes the form of the practical project and a written report or portfolio.

English Literature

Core module:

Literary Genres

You'll be introduced to literary texts which represent the established genres that form the foundation of Western literary tradition. You'll have the opportunity to explore how they've been adapted, modified and reformed in later periods and across cultures. You'll also have the chance to explore literary conventions and innovations, along with concepts and terms used in the analysis of literary texts. The assessment for this module consists of a mixture of written coursework and presentational assignments.

Option modules:

Choose one from a list which may include-

Thinking Critically

This module introduces you to a range of potential approaches for the study of literature at university level. You'll have the opportunity to evaluate key ideas and concepts from a range of theoretical approaches, taking a critical perspective to the discipline as a whole. You'll then have the chance to explore how to apply these ideas to literary and other texts. The assessment for this module consists of a mixture of written coursework and presentational assignments.

Year 2

Drama

Option modules:

Choose up to three from a list which may include-

Theatre and Performance Making

You’ll be asked to choose from a range of production projects, each offering the opportunity to specialise in a different aspect of theatre, drama or performance. Each project will culminate in a live public production or equivalent event; for example, a performance of an existing playtext, or a devised physical theatre piece or a series of theatre-in-education workshops delivered in schools. Assessment takes the form of the practical project and a written report or portfolio.


Models and Theories of Performance Practice 2a

This module focuses on the analytical study of contemporary performance practices. Through a series of workshops, lectures and seminars, you will be encouraged to use particular critical concepts to analyse and critique the work of a range of innovative theatre practitioners, including companies, directors, writers and performers. The assessment of this module is based entirely on coursework consisting of written and presentational assignments. Practitioners previously studied include Marina Abramović Forced Entertainment, Nicola Canavan, Ariane Mnouchkine, Tim Crouch, IOU Theatre, Mojisola Adebayo, Orlan, Split Britches, Augusto Boal and the Wooster Group.


Models and Theories of Performance Practice 2b

This module concentrates on the uses of theatre. You will have the opportunity to explore new practical and theoretical material including a range of Applied Theatre practice and ideology, introduced through lecture-workshops. You’ll then be encouraged to go on to develop researched case studies of contemporary practitioners and practices, concentrating on the uses of Drama, Theatre and Performance. You are encouraged to develop knowledge of practitioners and practices that sit outside of mainstream theatre and performance culture. The assessment of this module is based entirely on coursework consisting of written and presentational assignments.


Specialist Practice

You’ll be asked to choose to undertake a training project in one of a range of theatre skill areas, such as directing, performing, writing for performance, technical theatre, or workshop facilitation. A programme of training will help to prepare you to undertake an independent project which demonstrates your skills and understandings. The assessment of this module is based entirely on a skills presentation and a practical project.

English Literature

Core modules:

Literary Histories

In this module you will develop skills in contextual analysis relating to two different topics in literary studies. You will analyse digital resources, evaluate the arguments of a range of literary critics, and present your own arguments and ideas in a written essay and an oral presentation. The module incorporates a series of skills workshops in addition to the core of lectures and seminars on of two distinct literary topics. You will choose these from a range of options, which relate directly to the research expertise and scholarly publications of individual members of academic staff. The options on offer in 2017-18 are: - Renaissance Chivalry: Playing Knights and Ladies in the Golden Age - Twentieth-Century Fiction - Frontiers & Borders in American Literature - Twentieth- and Twenty First-Century Poetry - The Romantic Period - Old Worlds, New Worlds, Other Worlds - Extraordinary Gentlemen


Critical Concepts 1

This module aims to develop your understanding of key theoretical concepts and the productive ways in which these can be used in reading literary and cultural texts. It encourages you to engage with challenging ideas around nation, identity, history and culture.

Year 3

Drama

Core module:

Critical Context: Perspectives on Contemporary Drama, Theatre and Performance

This is a lecture and seminar series which presents you with a range of critical perspectives on examples of contemporary drama, theatre and performance. You’ll be encouraged to develop research in two areas of interest and assessment is based on coursework.

Option modules:

Choose one from a list which may include-

Process and Performance Project

The aim of this module is to allow you to engage in depth with a single staff directed process and performance. You will be expected to feed into your work the most relevant areas of skill and knowledge which you have gained elsewhere on your course. In preparing and rehearsing for one or more performances, you will be expected to practise, to extend, to contextualise and to develop the physical, creative, intellectual and practical skills necessary. Assessment takes the form of an individual contribution to a final performance event or other presentation and an individual portfolio.


Practice Analysis: Final Year Project

The Final Year Project is an opportunity to demonstrate practical skills in a significant theatre or performance role. Building on skills developed through earlier study, you will be able to negotiate a practical project that may focus on performing, directing, applied theatre practice, writing or technical and production skills. With input from a supervisor, you will then be asked to work largely independently to deliver the agreed project. Many of the practical projects appear in the Department’s annual Festival. Research and critical reflection on the practice is also developed in the module, which is assessed through a creative practical presentation and a written portfolio.


Critical Context: Dissertation

In this module, you’ll be asked to carry out an extended piece of independent research, and write a 7,000 word thesis. In keeping with traditional academic practice, you’ll then be asked to defend the thesis in an oral examination. The thesis and oral form the assessment for this module.



English Literature

Core modules:

Advanced Critical Practice

In this module you will consolidate the skills you have previously developed in critical analysis and use them to develop rigorous independent responses and innovative ideas that engage with the subjects of current debates in two separate fields of literary study. You will choose these from a range of options, which relate directly to the research expertise and scholarly publications of individual members of academic staff. The options on offer in 2017-18 are: - Renaissance Chivalry: Playing Knights and Ladies in the Golden Age - Twentieth-Century Fiction - Frontiers & Borders in American Literature - Twentieth- and Twenty First-Century Poetry - The Romantic Period - Old Worlds, New Worlds, Other Worlds - Extraordinary Gentlemen


Critical Concepts 2

This module aims to enhance your understanding of key theoretical concepts, inviting you to choose a particular literary topic and conceptual focus for your own original analysis of works of literature in relation to other fields of intellectual debate such as historiography, philosophy or film studies. It encourages you to challenge and build upon the concepts and methodologies that have underpinned literary criticism in the past by engaging you in interdisciplinary perspectives and advanced debates in contemporary literary theory. The module incorporates a series of concept workshops in addition to a core of lectures and seminars on a distinct literary topic, which you will choose from the range of available options. These options relate to the research expertise and scholarly publications of individual members of academic staff. The options on offer in 2017-18 are: - Renaissance Chivalry: Playing Knights and Ladies in the Golden Age - Twentieth-Century Fiction - Frontiers & Borders in American Literature - Twentieth- and Twenty First-Century Poetry - The Romantic Period - Old Worlds, New Worlds, Other Worlds - Extraordinary Gentlemen

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

We review all optional modules each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let students know in good time the options available for them to choose for the following year.

We will only change core modules for a course if it is necessary for us to do so, for example to maintain course accreditation. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before you begin the relevant academic year.

Sometimes we have to make changes to other aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. Again, we will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before the relevant academic year. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

Placements

Each year our first year students work with a professional theatre company which develops a project exclusively with our students for a three week residency at the University, culminating in a performance on the University campus.

The ERASMUS+ exchange provides an optional short term (12 or 24 weeks) opportunity to study abroad at one of our partner universities where you join in classes and receive credits towards your degree at the same time. We have partnerships with universities in Athens, Ghent, Granada, Hanover, Paris and the USA.

Career opportunities

92-95% of graduates from courses in this subject area go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating.

Drama graduates have gone on to work in the performing arts, in television, touring theatre, and running their own performance companies. English graduates have gone on to work in fields such as publishing, broadcasting, teaching, writing, advertising, management, politics and local government. A selection of companies that have employed Huddersfield graduates in recent years include BBC drama productions, ITV, Channel 4, BBC 6 Music, Royal National Theatre, The Old Vic, Lawrence Batley Theatre and Point Blank Theatre Company*. *Source: Linked In.

Teaching and assessment

20.3% of the study time on this course is spent in lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops etc. You'll experience practical workshops and performance projects in the three theatre/studio spaces, lectures and seminars, and one-to-one tutorials with specialist staff. Assessment of your work includes essays, research based practical presentations, creative practical working processes, performance, scripts and plays, and a dissertation. You submit work for assessment at intervals throughout the year.

Your module specification/course handbook will provide full details of the assessment criteria applying to your course.

Feedback (either written and/or verbal) is normally provided on all coursework submissions within three term time weeks – unless the submission was made towards the end of the session in which case feedback would be available on request after the formal publication of results.Feedback on final coursework is available on request after the publication of results.

Huddersfield is the only University where 100% of the teaching staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Academy.*

*permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching.

Facilities

Our drama facilities in Huddersfield are centred around a large, architecturally spectacular, converted Victorian church. The building contains three performance studios, seminar and rehearsal rooms and a dedicated workshop for set and prop building and design. These contemporary facilities are supported by experienced technical staff, with in-depth knowledge of 3D design, video, sound editing, computerised lighting and sound equipment. Studio One hosts work by contemporary performance and theatre companies as well as by our own students.

Our English facilities include flexible learning rooms equipped with video conferencing equipment, interactive smart boards with all-round ceiling projection and audio-visual cabinets with the usual cd/dvd playback and pc and laptop connections.

In the University Library, you'll find English subject specialists to help you find and use source materials. The library contains modern IT facilities with 24-hour access, our rapidly-expanding collection of linguistics and literature materials and comfortable spaces for you to work alone or in small groups.

From January 2017, English Literature modules will be taught in our new Oastler Building, a new £27.5m investment that will provide state-of-the-art teaching facilities for our students.

How much will it cost me?

In 2017/18, the tuition fee for UK and EU students at the University of Huddersfield will be £9,250.

Tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance for UK/EU students, including what your tuition fee covers, please see Fees and Finance. Please note that tuition fees for subsequent years of study may rise in line with inflation (RPI-X).

If you are an international student coming to study at the University of Huddersfield, please visit the International Fees and Finance pages for full details of tuition fees and support available.

Please email the Student Finance Office or call 01484 472210 for more information about fees and finance.

Course scholarships available – up to £3000. More details.

If you decide to apply for a course that includes a work placement, a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check may be required to enable you to undertake that placement in settings with children (e.g. within a School). Should the organisation you are going to be working in require one to be undertaken, the School will support you to apply for a check. Please note that there is a charge for the DBS check which is approximately £44.

Further study

Progression to a postgraduate course is dependent on successful completion of your undergraduate studies, there may also be minimum qualification requirements such as a first class or higher second (2.1) degree. Please check the course details to confirm this.

You may be interested in studying: Drama, Dance and Performance (MA by Research) English Language and Literature (MA by Research) Communication Cultural and Media Studies (MSc by Research)

International

If you're an international student (including EU) you can check if you meet our entry requirements (both academic and English language) by visiting our country pages.

If you do not meet the entry requirements you can consider completing a degree preparation programme (if you are from a country outside of the EU) at the University's International Study Centre (ISC). You can call the ISC on +44 (0)1273 339333 to discuss your options. You can also complete the online application form or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers.

If your English language is not at the required level (IELTS 6.5 overall), we have a range of Pre-Sessional English programmes that you can enrol on before starting your degree course. You will not need to take an IELTS test after completing one of our Pre-Sessional English programmes.

How to apply

Research community

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills that are current and highly relevant to industry.

Drama research focuses on practical explorations and developing innovative ways of teaching and training. Our academic staff and postgraduate researchers conduct research around areas of actor training, psycho-physicality, ensemble, creativity and improvisation. Other areas of interest include performance magic, theatre and learning disability, new writing forms and contemporary political theatre. There are currently two research groups in Drama: the Centre for Psychophysical Performance Research and the Magic Research Group.

English is a thriving subject area with a strong research culture in language, linguistics, literature and creative writing that is internationally recognised and of a high collaborative standard. There are currently two research groups in English: the Centre for Intercultural Politeness Research and the Stylistics Research Centre. Current individual staff research projects also include: Grist: The Anthology of New Writing and The Anne Clifford Project.

For more information, see the Research section of our website.

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