Architecture/Architecture (International) (RIBA Part 1) BA(Hons) 2017-18

This course also available for 2018-19 entry

Want to join us in September? You can now apply via Clearing

About the course

This course offers you a distinctive approach to the subject of architecture based upon a consideration of places and cultures around the world. You'll have the opportunity to examine different cultural regions and design your own innovative, beautiful, humane and sustainable architecture in response. You will also have the chance to develop the skills needed to operate in global multidisciplinary design and construction teams, with the support of the latest processes and technology, such as Building Information Modelling.

There are two strands to the course; Architecture and Architecture (International). Both will give you an opportunity to explore the complex regional, cultural, ethical and environmental issues that will underpin your development as an architect. The International strand provides a unique option to do this through an extended field study visit to a non‑European location. Recent visits have included Vietnam, Malaysia, India and China.* Our aim is to help you graduate ready to contribute to a multidisciplinary professional global design and construction team and prepare you for progression to the next stage of your architectural career.

This course is recognised by the Architects Registration Board (ARB), which regulates the architects' profession in the UK, as providing one of the qualifications needed to become an architect. You must register with the ARB to practise using the title ‘architect' in the UK.

The course is validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), which provides recognised qualifications to become an architect. The course is designed to enable you to gain exemption from RIBA's Part 1 Professional Examinations; the first of three parts required to qualify and register with the ARB as an architect.

This course scored 97% for overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, and we're ranked 6th in the country for Architecture in the Guardian University League Tables 2016.

*If you opt for the International route of the course in the final year, the extended overseas field study visit is compulsory and you will be required to fund your own place. The cost of the trip in recent years has been in the region of £1,400 per student.


UCAS code:
K100

Start date:
18 / 09 / 2017

Duration:

3 years full-time

Course type:

Full Time

Course content

To find out about what it's like to study architecture at Huddersfield, take a look at final year Architecture (International) BA(Hons) student Jade's film. She chose to study at the University of Huddersfield as she found it very friendly and welcoming with brilliant facilities. In her film, Jade talks about the travel opportunities she's had on her course including a visit to Vietnam, and how the course has helped her to develop as a designer.

Over three years the course aims to develop your understanding of the history and theory of architecture, materials, structures, environmental design, communications and architectural design. In the third year you can opt for the International route.

Year 1

Core modules:

Technology 1: An Introduction to Architectural Technology

This module introduces three parallel strands of Architectural Technology:

Structures Through an exploration of structural equilibrium and the assessment of stress and deformation in simple elements, the module will discuss the properties of building materials and the implications for element design.

Buildings Fabric Design Common materials, assemblies and construction techniques used to achieve safe, environmentally sound and aesthetic constructions will be explained and exemplified. Common failures in materials and assemblies will be highlighted.

Environmental Design A building’s fabric and services combine to create an internal environment that the occupants find comfortable and pleasurable. This extends to physiological (and psychological), thermal, visual and acoustic comfort, and the health and wellbeing of the occupants. You will consider how responsive design (both passive and interactive) can be utilised to provide the internal conditions necessary for comfort.

All of the above topics will be considered in relation to sustainable design necessary for protecting internal, local and global environments for both current and future generations. On-line multi choice test of one hour duration 50% / Reflective journal 50%


History and Theory 1: Spatial and Visual Culture

This module has two parallel strands: - An historical overview of Western, Islamic and Oriental architecture from the beginnings of civilisation to the start of the Renaissance. - An introduction to theoretical issues that relate to the manipulation of architectural space and form.

Whilst providing background knowledge it seeks to inculcate the idea that history is not a mere catalogue of styles, and that a study of the subject is essential to the designer.

Assessment: - Comparative Analysis of Architecture from different historical periods (equivalent in scope to 1,500 words) 30%. - Illustrated analysis of architectural precedent exploring theoretical issues (equivalent in scope to 1,500 words) 30%. - Study of an existing place. You will be required to select and represent specific qualities of built form in a variety of media. The context may be local or linked with an optional field study visit. Individual work will be expected within a group framework (equivalent in scope to 2,000 words) 40%.


Personal Development 1: An Introduction to Communication Skills

This module is concerned with your personal development as a designer with a specific focus on the introduction and development of basic 2D and 3D drawing, modelling, CAD and graphic techniques. You will be introduced to a range of architectural design and visualisation skills including the use of manual graphic and modelling techniques, the use of CAD and other digital media and the facilities and resources available within the School. The importance of developing good communication skills will be explained. As your skills develop you will be introduced to the notions of active learning and personal development planning. Assessment: - Integrated design development portfolio that demonstrates your ability to explore and present ideas and information (from this and adjacent modules) using a broad range of media and techniques. 60%. - Reflective learning journal that collates development work and other information and resources. 40%.


Design Studio 1: Basic Principles of Design

The module introduces basic principles of architectural composition. The module has particular focus on the relationship between people and space(s). It provides you with a vehicle to explore the process of design and to develop an understanding of its nature, components and effects. The module is delivered across the first 12 teaching weeks of the first year of study and is intended to introduce you to design as an integrative process through the realisation of architectural spaces and forms that satisfy specific and predetermined user requirements.

You will develop a body of work in response to projects. This is defined and structured by Module Tutors to promote an exploration of the fundamental elements of architectural components and assemblies. You will be encouraged to apply practical, technical and theoretical skills from adjacent modules.

The module will facilitate the development of presentation skills in all forms from spoken presentation at reviews and tutorials to the various and many modes of visual presentation, conceptualisation, prototyping and production.

Assessment: The production of a body of work, in the form of physical drawings and models, that demonstrates the manipulation and expression of architectural space and form at an elementary level. 100% Portfolio.


Design Studio 2: Theory and Form

The module explores the basic principles of architectural composition and the relationship between people, space and place. It provides you with a vehicle to explore the process of design and to develop an understanding of its nature, components and effects. The module is delivered across the second 12 teaching weeks of the first year of study and is intended to introduce you to design as an integrative process through the realisation of architectural spaces and forms that satisfy specific and predetermined user requirements.

The module takes a broad holistic approach that encompasses diverse and interdependent areas of practice and provides a framework on which you can base your design work in future. In particular the module introduces practical exploration of structural, constructional and environmental technologies and the expression of architectural ideas in relation to human requirements.

You will develop a body of work in response to projects. This is defined and structured by Module Tutors to promote an exploration of the fundamental elements of architectural components and assemblies. You will be encouraged to apply practical, technical and theoretical skills from adjacent modules. The module will facilitate the development of presentation skills in all forms from spoken presentation at reviews and tutorials to the various and many modes of visual presentation, conceptualisation, prototyping and production.

Assessment: The production of a body of work, in the form of physical drawings and models that explore the principles of architectural composition and the relationship between people, space and place. 100% Portfolio.

Year 2

Core modules:

Technology 2: Integrated Technology

The module develops your understanding of technological innovation in architecture in relation to the three parallel strands of Structures, Building Fabric Design and Environmental Design.

Structures You will explore the use of a variety of materials and assemblies and consider their behaviour under gravity and lateral loading. Different foundations and earth-retaining structures will be introduced and methods for the assessment of stability will be developed. You will be introduced to the principles of designing structural members subject to bending and axial loading and the principles of elastic behaviour in structural members of any cross-section.

Building Fabric Design You will consider more advanced construction techniques and building systems and you will extend and develop your technical vocabulary, your appreciation of natural and synthetic material elements, and the principles and techniques of their transformation into objects and components used in the assembly of buildings and building components.

Environmental Design You will develop further the consideration of psychological and physiological, thermal, visual and acoustic comfort, and the affects on building occupants. Because of the close relationship between environmental systems, energy consumption and the health and wellbeing of a building’s occupants, issues of sustainability will be considered at all stages. In particular you will focus on the range of environmental control systems found in buildings and how these affect our interaction with the spaces we inhabit and the artefacts and services we use. General services used to provide safety and facility in buildings will be considered such as mechanical movement, electrical and drainage systems.

On-line multi choice test of hour duration 50% / Reflective journal 50%.


History and Theory 2 : Place and Precedent

The focus of the module will be upon place and precedent. It will enable you to deepen your understanding of the history of architecture as well as architectural and urban design theory, and will provide an informed background against which your own ideas can develop and mature. The module explores the development of architecture and urban design from the beginning of the Renaissance to the start of the 21st century and examines contemporary movements and practices by analysing principal characteristics, raisons d’être and the work of leading exponents. Themes and issues will be explored with reference to the work and writings of significant theorists and practitioners from a broad philosophical spectrum. You will be introduced to the specific historical/political development in a variety of contexts, which will provide an understanding of the relationship between the climate, socio-economic, and cultural and religious factors and architectural development. The module introduces you to a range of architectural and urban design strategies and methodologies that will develop your critical understanding based on a sound theoretical foundation. Assessment: - Coursework 1. Illustrated comparative appraisal of historical and contemporary architecture (equivalent in scope to 2,500 words) 50%. - Coursework 2. Illustrated report on an urban district (equivalent in scope to 2,500 words) 50%.


Personal Development 2: Techniques of Representation

This module asks you to think carefully about your own acquisition of design, communication and interpersonal skills and the importance of these both in terms of your own personal development and in terms of your impact upon and response to others. You will be asked to explore critical techniques of representation in order to build upon your architectural design and visualisation skills. You will extend your CAD and graphic skills and you will be asked to explore the potential for visual and physical modelling techniques in relation to CAD and other digital media. You will continue to explore your own learning and personal development, with a particular emphasis on feedback and dialogue.

Assessment: - Integrated design development portfolio that demonstrates your ability to explore and critique ideas and information (from this and adjacent modules) using a broad range of physical and digital techniques of representation. 60%. - Reflective learning journal that collates development work and other information and resources in relation to your own learning and personal development (equivalent in scope to 1,000 words) 40%.


Design Studio 3: Place and Architecture

This module is delivered across the first 12 teaching weeks of the second year of study. The module requires you to produce works of increasing sophistication having successfully completed Design Studio 1 and Design Studio 2 (or equivalent) and will enable you to explore the relationship between theory and practical design activity. You will be supported in managing your studio time and will be expected to apply technical skills and critical awareness drawn from this and adjacent modules, which will form the context for the module.

The content of the module will comprise a number of design projects which will enable you to develop your skills at integrating architectural design with material and environmental technologies in an holistic design solution. You will develop a body of work in response to a studio theme. This will be defined and structured by module tutors to promote the integration of ideas and experimental practice in the production of the design proposals.

Assessment: The production of a body of work, in the form of physical drawings and models that demonstrate the manipulation and expression of architectural space and form in response to a specific context. 100% Portfolio.


Design Studio 4: Integrated Design

This module is delivered across the second 12 teaching weeks of the second year of study. The module requires you to produce works of increasing sophistication having successfully completed Design Studio 1, Design Studio 2 and Design Studio 3 (or equivalent) and will enable you to explore the relationship between theory and practical design activity. You will be supported in managing your studio time and will be expected to apply technical skills and critical awareness drawn from this and adjacent modules, which will form the context for the module. You will extend your understanding of the relationship between contemporary design theories and practice in order to facilitate a critical approach to the self-evaluation of design ideas and to provide an intellectual framework in support of your independent design development. You will further develop your understanding of architecture and human activity with particular emphasis upon the relationship between social and cultural trends, constructional and environmental technologies and the physical context of architectural design. In essence the module aims to integrate concepts, context of use, technical production and aesthetics. This will be developed and tested through debate and practical activity.

Assessment: The production of a body of work, in the form of physical drawings and models that demonstrates the integrated exploration and expression of architectural space and form. 100% Portfolio.

Final Year

Core modules:

Technology 3: Materials and Tectonics

This module is concerned with the technical resolution of your Major Design Project in adjacent module Design Studio 6: Culture, Context, Place (or a negotiated alternative). It requires the production of written and illustrated technical precedent studies exploring aspects of architectural technology. You will be expected to explore contemporary technologies and, where possible examine some at the current boundaries of professional practice and the academic discipline of architecture. You are expected to critically reflect upon what you have learnt and resolve the technical and tectonic detail design of your Major Design Project.

Assessment: - Illustrated technical precedent studies. 30%. - Tectonic investigations and detailed resolution of an Architectural design, which would typically be communicated through substantive drawings of each of the structural, environmental and services and constructional material strategies. 70%


History and Theory 3: Architectural Dissertation

This module allows you to explore the cultural context of architecture through the research and preparation of an architectural dissertation. You are asked to consider your own emerging interests and skills in relation to the broader architectural discourse and to select and explore a topic of relevance to your development as an architectural designer and thinker. The specific topic will be identified and defined in negotiation with your module tutor in order to support, where possible, your design studies in adjacent modules. You will be introduced to a range of appropriate methods to research, analyse, interpret and critically evaluate your subject, and you will be asked to present your evaluation in written and visual form in a structured and objective manner. Assessment: A 5500 word illustrated dissertation, double spaced typed and hard bound - two copies. 100%.


Personal Development 3: Professional Studies

This module will allow you to meet the professional practice requirements for RIBA/ARB at part 1. Within this module you are asked to consider your own career development and your position, upon graduation, within an architectural practice. In preparation for this period of professional practice, the module aims to: - Examine the construction professions and their role in the construction industry in the UK. - Provide an overview of the law and contractual procedures in the UK - Analyse the appropriate legislation related to the building process in the UK. - Examine principles of multi-disciplinary teamwork, communications and co-ordination which are necessary to practice in the current professional environment. - Develop your management skills.

Assessment: - A series of diagnostic exercises culminating in a 90 minute, unseen, written examination sat under University examination regulations, exploring practice based problems. 60%. - Professionally presented CV and portfolio. 40%.


Design Studio 5: Event Space Form

The module is delivered across the first 12 teaching weeks of the third year of study. This module requires you to produce works of increasing sophistication having successfully completed Design Studio, Design Studio 2, Design Studio 3 and Design Studio 4 (or equivalent) and will enable you to explore more thoroughly the relationship between theory and practical design activity. You will develop a body of work in response to a studio theme. This will be defined and structured by Module Tutors to promote the integration of ideas and experimental practice in the production of the design proposals. The emphasis in this module will be on: - Exploring the notion of ‘event’ and how we make places and architecture which respond to this notion. - Developing your design thinking as an architectural narrative, forming proposals which are poetic expressions of ideas.

Projects will not promote complex programmatic and organisational problems, but will rather allow in depth exploration of powerful philosophical and theoretical approaches. You will be supported in managing your studio time and will be expected to apply technical skills and critical awareness drawn from this and adjacent modules, which will form the context for the module. You will extend your understanding of the relationship between contemporary design theories and practice in order to facilitate a critical approach to the self-evaluation of design ideas and to provide an intellectual framework in support of your independent design development.

Assessment: The production of a body of work, in the form of physical drawings and models, that demonstrate the manipulation and expression of architectural space and form. 100% Portfolio.

Option modules:

Choose either-

Design Studio 6: Culture Context Place

This module is delivered across the second 12 teaching weeks of the third year of study. It is concerned with the study of a real place in a largely familiar context, the identification and analysis of specific locations for a new building, preparation of a design brief and the development of architectural design proposals that express an architectural narrative, satisfy specific and predetermined user requirements and resolve spatial organisation. As part of an organised group you will undertake a study of a specific location established by the module tutor. The region studied will normally be based in the UK, but reference and comparison will be made in relation to other regions both within the UK and further afield. You are to develop an intimate understanding of the place through an in depth investigation, which extends beyond the familiar and obvious information to reveal the context in a new light. You will explore the distinctive regional characteristics and you will be asked to think very carefully about all aspects of the place in order to examine the underlying principles that lead to specific developments in architecture and urban design. You will examine precedents of building types and technologies. You will be asked to explore relationships between environmental, cultural, social, economic, political and religious factors in relation to urban and architectural development in a broadly familiar cultural context. You will identify and analyse specific locations for a new building and prepare a design brief. You will prepare an in-depth site analysis in preparation for design development.

The module will culminate in a Major Design Project which will draw upon previous experience to produce a holistic architectural design, which not only satisfies functional needs, but is also responsive and appropriate to the context of the chosen location.

Assessment: - Illustrated Field Study Report and Design Brief (equivalent in scope to 2,000 words) 20%. - A portfolio of work consisting of: A Major Design Project presentation in the form of final scheme drawings and models; design development notes in the form of drawings, developmental/working models; and a project report (no more than 1,000 words) 80%.


or

Design Studio 6: Culture Context Place (International)

This module is delivered across the second 12 teaching weeks of the third year of study. The module is concerned with the study of a real place in an unfamiliar context, the identification and analysis of specific locations for a new building, preparation of a design brief and the development of architectural design proposals that express an architectural narrative, satisfy specific and predetermined user requirements and resolve spatial organisation. As part of an organised group you will undertake a study visit to a specific location established by the module tutor. The region studied will be non-European, but reference and comparison will be made in relation to other regions around the world. The aim of the study visit is to enable you to experience a foreign cultural context and conduct investigations and research in this unfamiliar environment. In this context you will examine the relationship between architecture, society and environment and explore and expose its distinctiveness. You will be asked to think very carefully about all aspects of the place in order to examine the underlying principles that lead to specific developments in architecture and urban design. You will examine precedents of building types and technologies. You will be asked to explore the relationships between environmental, cultural, social, economic, political and religious factors in relation to urban and architectural development in an unfamiliar cultural context. You will identify and analyse specific locations for a new building and prepare a design brief. You will prepare an in-depth site analysis in preparation for design development. The module will culminate in a Major Design Project which will draw upon previous experience to produce a holistic architectural design, which not only satisfies functional needs, but is also responsive and appropriate to the cultural and environmental context of the chosen location. Assessment: - Illustrated Field Study Report and Design Brief (equivalent in scope to 2,000 words) 20%. - A portfolio of work consisting of: A Major Design Project presentation in the form of final scheme drawings and models; design development notes in the form of drawings, developmental/working models; and a project report (no more than 1,000 words) 80%.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

We review all optional modules each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let students know in good time the options available for them to choose for the following year.

We will only change core modules for a course if it is necessary for us to do so, for example to maintain course accreditation. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before you begin the relevant academic year.

Sometimes we have to make changes to other aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. Again, we will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before the relevant academic year. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

Placements

If you intend to follow the route to become a qualified architect then, upon successful completion of the degree, through which you'll attain the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 1 professional qualification, you'll need to undertake a year working in professional practice before continuing to RIBA Part 2.

We have excellent links with architectural practices around the world and our students have found employment in a wide range of practices, from the smallest architectural firms to the largest, working on a huge variety of projects at home and overseas.

Career opportunities

95% of graduates from this course go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating.

If you intend to follow the route to become a qualified architect then, upon successful completion* of the BA(Hons) degree, through which you'll attain the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 1 professional qualification, you would be eligible for admission to our Architecture/Architecture (International) (RIBA Part 2) MArch course. The first year of this course is a ‘year out' which would be spent working in a professional practice, before continuing to full time study at the University in the subsequent 2 years.

Alternatively, you may choose to specialise in other areas after the course, such as sustainability, 3D computer applications, management, or a range of other disciplines including journalism.

*Successful completion is classed as passing Architecture/Architecture (International) BA(Hons) with First-Class Honours (1st), Upper Second-Class Honours (2:1), Lower Second-Class Honours (2:2) or Third-Class Honours (3rd).

Professional links and accreditations

This course is:

•  prescribed by the Architects Registration Board (ARB), which regulates the architects' profession in the UK and ensures the course meets the required standards of the profession.

•  validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) to provide exemption from the Part 1 examinations.

Qualification as an architect requires a further two years' study after the BA(Hons) degree (RIBA Part 1), plus periods in practice, leading to a Master of Architecture/Architecture (International) and Postgraduate Certificate of Professional Practice and Management in Architecture (RIBA Parts 2 and 3).

Teaching and assessment

36% of the study time on this course is spent in lectures, seminars, workshops etc.

The course is delivered using a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and a series of design studio projects. Studio-based design is central to this course, for which you'll have access to high quality resources in computing and modelling, professional support and tuition. You'll learn through design projects and assignments. All modules in Years 2 and 3 count towards final Honours classification.

You'll be assessed on a combination of your portfolios of design work, written assignments, seminar presentations and classroom tests, individually and in groups.

Your module specification/course handbook will provide full details of the assessment criteria applying to your course.

Feedback (usually written) is normally provided on all coursework submissions within three term time weeks – unless the submission was made towards the end of the session in which case feedback would be available on request after the formal publication of results. Feedback on exam performance/final coursework is available on request after the publication of results.

Huddersfield is the UK's only University where all our permanent teaching staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Academy.*

*Permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching.

Facilities

You'll be based in Queen Street Studios, which as well as housing contemporary studio space also offers advanced 3D technologies. This includes dedicated high-performance computer aided design (CAD) and 3D computer visualisation facilities, laser cutters with metal-cutting capabilities, 3D workshops for rapid prototyping, plus high definition and multi material 3D printers for the creation of 3D models. You'll also have access to the Digital Print Centre, our specialist facility capable of printing on a variety of media. All of this is supported by our expert technical staff.

In addition to having full access to the facilities during University opening hours, you'll also be able to access the specialist software licensed to the University from your own computer, whilst away from the campus out of studio opening hours. This means you won't have to invest in expensive software packages during the course.

How much will it cost me?

In 2017/18, the tuition fee for UK and EU students at the University of Huddersfield will be £9,250.

Tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance for UK/EU students, including what your tuition fee covers, please see Fees and Finance.

If you are an international student coming to study at the University of Huddersfield, please visit the International Fees and Finance pages for full details of tuition fees and support available.

Please email the Student Finance Office or call 01484 472210 for more information about fees and finance.

Field Trips:

Inspirational field trips to destinations of educational and cultural significance are a component of the course and will be funded by the University.

If you opt for the international route of the course in the final year, an extended overseas field study trip is a compulsory component of the BA(Hons) Architecture (International) degree programme. Previous destinations and costs in recent years include:

•  Vietnam, 25 days, approx. £1,396

•  China, 21 days, approx £1,451 per student

Materials:

You will need to supply your own materials during the course. These include sketchbooks, drawing equipment, materials for producing models and printing. The approximate cost of these items in recent years has been £500 in year one, £375 in year two and £575 in the final year. These costs may vary based on the materials you choose and the approximate costs are given as a guide only.

Further study

Progression to a postgraduate course is dependent on successful completion of your undergraduate studies, there may also be minimum qualification requirements such as a first class or higher second (2.1) degree. Please check the course details to confirm this.

You may be interested in studying:

Architecture/Architecture (International) (RIBA Part 2) Master of

Advanced Architectural Design MA

Sustainable Architecture MSc

Urban Design MA

Design Integration and Building Information Modelling (BIM) MSc

Advanced Project Management in Construction MSc

International

Huddersfield is a multi-cultural town and the international student population of the University is large and diverse. Architecture in particular usually attracts applicants from all over the world. This is a real strength of the course, as you may have the opportunity to undertake your studies alongside colleagues with a range of cultural and educational experiences.

The course aims to explore the relationship between architecture, society and environment. It's therefore suitable for students from a variety of cultural backgrounds and from different climatic regions, who may wish ultimately to practice architecture in their home country, or elsewhere in the world. You'll have the opportunity to examine the differences and similarities of built environments around the globe and look for innovative and enterprising approaches to the development of architecture in widely different contexts.

If you choose the International route of the course, you'll have the opportunity to visit a non-European country to carry out analysis of a location in which to develop a comprehensive building design in your final year. Student projects in recent years have explored locations in China, India, Malaysia, the Middle East and Vietnam.

If you're an international student (including EU) you can check if you meet our entry requirements (both academic and English language) by visiting our country pages.

If you do not meet the entry requirements you can consider completing a degree preparation programme (if you are from a country outside of the EU) at the University's International Study Centre (ISC). You can call the ISC on +44 (0) 1273 339333 to discuss your options. You can also complete the online application form or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers.

If your English language is not at the required level (IELTS 6.0 overall), we have a range of Pre-Sessional English programmes that you can enrol on before starting your degree course. You will not need to take an IELTS test after completing one of our Pre-Sessional English programmes.

How to apply

Research community

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills that are current and highly relevant to industry. For more information, see the Research section of our website.

You may also like ...


© 2017 University of Huddersfield - All rights reserved

VAT registration number 516 3101 90