Chemistry (PhD) 2017-18

This course also available for 2018-19 entry

The Research Degree

A PhD is the highest academic award for which a student can be registered.This programme allows you to explore and pursue a research project built around a substantial piece of work, which has to show evidence of original contribution to knowledge.

A full-time PhD is a three year full-time programme of research and culminates in the production of a large-scale piece of written work in the form of a research thesis that should not normally exceed 40,000 words.

Completing a PhD can give you a great sense of personal achievement and help you develop a high level of transferable skills which will be useful in your subsequent career, as well as contributing to the development of knowledge in your chosen field.

You are expected to work to an approved programme of work including appropriate programmes of postgraduate study (which may be drawn from parts of existing postgraduate courses, final year degree programmes, conferences, seminars, masterclasses, guided reading or a combination of study methods).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members to advise and support you on your project.


Start date:
This research degree has multiple possible start dates including:
18 / 09 / 2017
08 / 01 / 2018
16 / 04 / 2018

Your start date may be decided in agreement with your supervisor.

Duration:

The maximum duration for a full time PhD is 3 years (36 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 12 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Entry requirements

The normal level of attainment required for entry is:

•  a Master's degree from a UK University or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or

•  an upper second class honours degree (2:1) from a UK university in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed, or

•  appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

For applicants whose first language or language of instruction is not English you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum of IELTS 6.0 overall with the written element at least 6.0 with no element lower than 5.5, will be considered acceptable, or equivalent.

Further information on international entry requirements and English language entry requirements is available on our international webpages

Contact:

Tel: +44 (0) 1484 473969
Email: researchdegrees@hud.ac.uk

Places available:

This is dependent upon supervisory capacity within the subject area

(this number may be subject to change)

Location:
Huddersfield, HD1 3DH

Apply now Book on an Open Day or Study Fair Order a prospectus Ask a question

What can I research?

Research topics available for this degree:

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below for full details of individual research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria.

Research titleSupervisorsApply
Analysis of biologically active macromolecules produced by probiotic bacteria.
Outline

Probiotic bacteria produce polysaccharides that they release into the environment. Many of these polysaccharides have desirable biological and chemical activity. This research programme will use the tools of analytical science to determine the structures of these polysaccharides. Students will be trained in the use of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

Eligibility

The normal level of attainment required for entry is: • a Master's degree from a UK University or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or • an upper second class honours degree (2:1) from a UK university in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed, or • appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Antibiotic resistance
Outline

Antibiotic resistance – mechanisms, detection and overcoming

Eligibility

Minimum First class honours degree in Chemistry/Biochemistry

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Catalysis using Earth-abundant metals
Outline

These projects will be focused on the use of easily renewable metal catalysts in the preparation of functional and complex molecules. The projects will be informed by input from industry collaborators (in pharmaceutical, agrochemical and fine chemical sectors) and the chemical matter created will be assayed for biological activity, where appropriate, in collaboration with a range of academic laboratories (e.g. University of York).

Eligibility

Candidates must hold a BSc degree in Chemistry with First class honours (or equivalent) from a recognised awarding body (e.g., UK/EU/USA university). Applicants should have skills/interests in preparative organic chemistry.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £10,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Catalysis with Iodoarenes
Outline

Small organic molecules are important in drug discovery and in novel materials research. The development of sustainable syntheses to these compounds using small organic molecules as catalysts is an important area of research. The aim of this project is to develop new iodoarene catalysts, especially chiral variants, and investigate their utility in the formation of small organic molecules.

Eligibility

Eligibility First or Upper Second class honours degree (or overseas equivalent) in Chemistry or a closely related subject.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Catalytic routes to non-planar heterocycles
Outline

The project will develop synthetic routes to novel bridged bicyclic amines, non-racemic three-dimensional drug-like scaffolds, using flexible and scalable catalysis. It will extend chemistry we have previously reported in Chem. Commun. 2012, 48, 4836 and Chem. Commun. 2013, 49, 8931.

Eligibility

The successful candidate will have, or be expected to obtain, a 2:1 or 1st class honours degree in chemistry, and be able to demonstrate excellent practical skills and a strong interest in synthetic organic chemistry.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6.000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Developing optically generated sensitivity enhancements in solution state NMR spectroscopy
Outline

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an incredibly powerful and versatile analytical technique. Providing structural and dynamic information at the atomic level NMR is ubiquitous within the physical sciences but development of new applications, or even routine exploitation in the case of volume limited samples, is hindered by low intrinsic sensitivity. NMR sensitivity can be boosted by transferring ‘spin polarization’ from unpaired electrons. Whilst such transfer has conventionally been achieved using microwave pumping of electronic transitions in so-called dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments, there are major technical challenges to this approach. Recently we have demonstrated a method using optical excitation instead of microwave irradiation. This not only overcomes a number of technical challenges, but also potentially offers much higher sensitivity gains above the maximum possible in microwave DNP. This PhD project will build upon the recent proof of principle demonstration of optically pumped DNP, investigating multiple factors such as illumination time, illumination wavelength, magnetic field strength and choice of polarizing agent. The theory underpinning the technique will also be tested and new numerical models devised. This will allow development of the methodology from proof of principle to real-world application.

Eligibility

Minimum BSc First class honours in Chemistry, Physics or closely related discipline

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Development and applications of a novel thermomicroscopy-Direct Analysis in Real Time mass spectrometry system
Outline

This project involves the combination of thermal analysis and ambient ionisation mass spectrometry (specifically, DART-MS). A new integrated system has been developed that allows for investigation of the behaviour of complex materials as a function of temperature. The successful candidate will further develop and refine the system and investigate its wide-ranging applications.

Eligibility

A minimum of an Upper Second class honours degree in Chemistry or a closely related subject (e.g. Chemical Engineering) from an EU university is required; experience of using mass spectrometry or thermal analysis instrumentation is desirable.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £3,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Development of new luminescent complexes for dual-mode luminescent imaging/photodynamic theranostic applications
Outline

Complexes of metals such as Ru(II), Ir(III), Re(I) etc have attracted enormous interest in the literature due to their intriguing and attractive photophysical properties. Our group has paid particular attention to the study of complexes bearing 1,2,3-triazole based ligands and have reported encouraging results on their use as cellular imaging probes and singlet oxygen sensitisation. These complexes therefore have potential applicability as dual-mode theranostic agents. The project will therefore involve the synthesis and characterisation of new luminescent complexes and their optimisation for cellular imaging and photodynamic therapy.

See the following publications from our group at https://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffid=222

Eligibility

Applicants should have or be about to obtain the equivalent of a First Class Honours degree in Chemistry.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Extraction, purification and characterisation of novel polysaccharides from new sustainable sources
Outline

In this project novel polysaccharides will be identified, purified, fully characterised. One major concern is that a large amount of work has previously been carried out on crude material and not on highly purified or well characterised polysaccharide components which makes conclusions on functionality difficult.

Eligibility

Minimum BSc upper 2nd class honours in Chemistry or related subject

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Graphene-polymer nanocomposites: processing and characterisation
Outline

In comparison to traditional composite materials, nanocomposites exhibit enhanced properties through the incorporation of nanofillers. Polymer-based nanocomposites combine the benefits of polymers, such as low cost and ease of processing, with the unique features of the nanomaterials, such as high surface to volume ratio, high aspect ratio, excellent toughness and strength and improved electrical and thermal conductivities. In the last few years, polymer nanocomposites with enhanced optical, mechanical, electrical and thermal properties have been developed. A key challenge for nanocomposites is to prevent agglomeration of the nanofillers, in order to optimise property enhancement. Potential applications of nanocomposites include aerospace, automotive, marine, sports materials, construction, structures, electrical and electronic systems, biomedical devices, thermal management systems, adhesives, paints and coatings, industrial tooling and other general consumer products. In parallel with these developments, the discovery of graphene has been heralded as a game-changer for many areas of science and engineering, including materials science. The power of graphene is that it combines a range of exceptional properties in one material. A key challenge for promoting practical applications of graphene is to translate these properties into macro-structured materials. Putting these two concepts together, graphene-polymer nanocomposites utilise graphene as the nanofiller such that they combine the benefits of nanocomposites with the unique properties of graphene. Further to this, the synergistic effect of incorporating two or more nanofillers to form ‘hybridised nanocomposites’ has also been proposed for additional enhancement of properties. For example, the remarkable synergetic effect between graphene platelets and multiwalled carbon nanotubes has been observed to greatly improve the mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of nanocomposites. However, graphene-polymer and hybridised nanocomposites are at an early stage of development and their properties and behaviour are not fully understood. As such, there is great scope for further work and exploitation of these materials. This project will examine the processing of a range of graphene-polymer nanocomposites, test mechanical properties, assess thermal stability and examine breakage characteristics, in order to understand and optimise the behaviour of these materials.

Eligibility

Applicants should have a minimum of a First Class Honours degree in Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Materials Science or Mechanical Engineering.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Greener Approaches to Heterocyclic Synthesis
Outline

The aim of this research programme is to develop clean and efficient synthetic approaches to the formation of heterocycles and to develop these compounds into dyes for solar cells, cancer prodrugs and OLEDs. This research applies green chemistry principles to the development of novel synthetic methods, resulting in benefits in terms of costs, time and to the environment. Preliminary results have demonstrated both the validity and potential of this approach. The primary objectives of this PhD are to: • Develop novel syntheses of aromatic azoles and investigate the reactivity of these heterocycles, especially their conversion into novel dyes for solar cell. • Develop sustainable methods for the synthesis and manipulation of novel heterocycles towards the development of novel prodrugs for the treatment of cancer. • Use these heterocycles as ligands for OLEDs

Eligibility

Good BSc or MSc degree in Chemistry (or equivalent)

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. in addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Investigating Autoxidation Mechanisms by EPR Spectroscopy
Outline

Autoxidation is one of the main mechanisms of oxidative degradation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). It can result in a reduced shelf life for a pharmaceutical product, the need for low temperature storage and shipments or the inclusion of antioxidants in a formulation. When a new API enters development understanding the risk of autoxidation is therefore crucial. The autoxidation mechanism is well-known; an initially formed radical combines with oxygen from air to form a peroxyl radical. The peroxyl radical can then abstract any weakly bound hydrogen atom, to generate a new radical that can propagate the chain reaction. In principle, the chain reaction can be fast as long as the breaking CH bond is weaker than the OH bond that is formed in the hydrogen transfer. The CH bond dissociation energy can be accurately calculated for a hydrogen atom in any molecule and if autoxidation occurs these values are very good at predicting the site at which it will occur. However, the absolute value is not the sole predictor of whether autoxidation occurs at all. The ability of the chain mechanism to propagate seems key, with the subsequent formation of both carbon based and oxygen based radicals. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying free radical formation and as such can be used to investigate autoxidative degradation mechanisms in APIs. Building on previous work in which EPR was validated as a tool for non-destructive investigation of the extent of API oxidation in this PhD project EPR will be used to investigate the factors allowing autoxidation reactions to propagate, and ways in which autoxidation can be prevented.

Eligibility

Minimum BSc First class honours in Chemistry or closely related discipline

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Manipulation of excited state dynamics in 1,2,3-triazole complexes: accessing highly novel photochemistry
Outline

Complexes of metals such as Ru(II), Ir(III), Re(I) etc have attracted enormous interest in the literature due to their intriguing and attractive photophysical properties. Our group has paid particular attention to the study of complexes bearing 1,2,3-triazole based ligands and have shown in these systems highly novel photochemical reactivity. This project will involve the synthesis and characterisation of new triazole-based complexes and their detailed spectroscopic and theoretical investigation in order to elucidate the mechanism of their photochemical reactivity.

See the following publications from our group at https://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffid=222

Eligibility

Applicants should have or be about to obtain the equivalent to a First Class Honours degree in Chemistry.

Funding

There is currently no funding for this project and we encourage interested self-funding students to apply. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Novel photophysical and photochemical properties of 1,2,3-triazole-based transition metal complexes.
Outline

Complexes of metals such as Ru(II), Ir(III), Re(I) etc have attracted enormous interest in the literature due to their intriguing and attractive photophysical properties. Our group has paid particular attention to the study of complexes bearing 1,2,3-triazole based ligands and have shown these systems to have fascinatingly diverse properties from intense luminescent emission to highly novel «a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201604959" target=" "»photochemical reactivity«/a». Such complexes therefore present potential applications in areas of materials science, biological luminescent imaging and in photodynamic molecular medicines. The project will therefore involve the synthesis and thorough photophysical characterisation of a series of triazole-based complexes and assessment for these potential applications.

See the following publications from our group at https://www.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffid=222

Eligibility

We are seeking a highly motivated self-funding student who is enthusiastic and seeking supervision for research towards the degree of PhD. Suitable for UK, EU or International applicants holding, or about to obtain the equivalent of a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry at the First Class level.

Funding

There is currently no funding for this project and we encourage interested self-funding students to apply. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are also required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Physical property prediction, analysis and modelling
Outline

A civil engineer cannot design architectural structures without knowing the mechanical properties of the building materials being used. Similarly, scientists and engineers require access to physical properties of chemicals to design and validate experiments and industrial processes. Physical properties depend on the nature of molecules of the substance. The ultimate generalisation of physical properties requires a complete understanding of molecular behaviour, which we do not have yet. Reliable physical property data estimation is important for a range of applications. These include the design of industrial processes, computer-aided molecular design, prediction of physicochemical properties for regulatory purposes, toxicity prediction, and determining the properties of substances for which direct measurement is difficult or impossible. There are a number of approaches to property estimation and prediction, including using the law of corresponding states, empirical data fitting, first order approximations using group contributions, quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs), statistical mechanics, and molecular modelling. However, many existing approaches fall down on a number of counts. Weaknesses include: replying on data collected under varying conditions or with different protocols; undefined ranges of applicability; use of imprecise data; repetition of data from the same compound within the training and/or validation dataset; inadequate or misinterpretation of statistics; inadequate and/or undisclosed dataset; and failure to validate correctly. This project will combine the power of experimental measurements with data analysis and computation modelling. It is expected that the triangulation and cross-validation of these approaches will allow us to greatly advance physical property estimation and prediction methodologies.

Eligibility

Applicants should have a minimum of a First Class Honours degree in Chemistry

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Process Simulation of Azeotropic Distillation Methods
Outline

The purification of systems that exhibit azeotropic behaviour is a key challenge for many industrial processes. Various approaches to solving this challenge have been explored since the late 1920s. One such approach is pressure swing distillation (PSD). This method utilizes the pressure sensitivity of some binary azeotropes to shift the azeotropic composition of the mixture. Another, more common method that has been used since the 1920s is extractive distillation (ED). This method involves adding a third component called an entrainer to a binary mixture creating a ternary mixture. This method is becoming increasingly unpopular due to the restriction of solvent uses by environmental health and safety commissions world-wide, and it may continue to become more unpopular due to increase in global demand for reduced energy usage and CO2 emissions. As such it is imperative to better understand both approaches, to examine how they can be improved and to explore alternative solutions. For example, various PSD studies exist, however, these only scratched the surface of PSD development; this might be due in part to a lack of interest from industry or the prevalence of previous work into ED systems. These works, along with others have shown that PSD can have numerous benefits over more contemporary methods if built and utilized to full optimization. PSD could become more widely used, however, further work is needed to unlock the full potential of this methodology. Furthermore, the identification and study of greener solvents for use as entrainers in ED is a very underdeveloped area. In addition, alternative/novel methods for azeotrope purification are lacking and the reasons for an absence of innovation in this area is unclear. This project will utilise process simulation in order to examine the optimisation of existing approaches to azeotropic distillation, to identify and test more environmentally friendly entrainers for ED and to explore the feasibility of novel methods for azeotrope purification.

Eligibility

Applicants should have a minimum of a First Class Honours degree in Chemical Engineering

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £3.000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Prospecting in industrial waste streams for high value carbohydrate derivatives
Outline

The processing of cellulose in the production of polymeric materials by industry generates very significant amounts of waste products. Amongst these are a group of molecules that are called saccharinic acids. Saccharinic acids are potentially valuable platform chemicals and can be converted into a number of activated substrates that can be used as starting materials by the fine chemical industry. A number of projects are looking at developing potential applications for saccharinic acids in organic synthesis and a range of protecting group and activation chemistries are being explored. We are looking to start a programme of work to determine if these molecules can be employed in the production of polymers.

Eligibility

The normal level of attainment required for entry is: • a Master's degree from a UK University or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or • an upper second class honours degree (2:1) from a UK university in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed, or • appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Sugar-Powered Catalysis
Outline

The aim of this research programme is to harness the reducing potential of sustainable sugars to power catalytic reactions for the clean and efficient synthesis of complex molecules. This research investigates a completely new concept, sugar-powered catalysis, in which simple sugars (e.g. glucose) first reduce metal salts to generate metal nanoparticles and then provide the chemical power to drive otherwise unfavourable reactions catalysed by these nanoparticles in situ. Preliminary results have demonstrated both the validity and potential of this powerful concept. The primary objectives of this PhD are to: • Develop the novel use of renewable reducing sugars in catalytic palladium nanoparticle reactions for the facile construction of chemical bonds. • Elucidate the active metal catalyst (size / morphology) and kinetic profile of these new reactions as well as the fate of the reducing sugar.

Eligibility

Good BSc or MSc degree in Chemistry (or equivalent)

Funding

Applicants will need to be self-funding. Tuition fees and bench fees of £5,000 per annum are payable.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Synthesis and Characterisation of Graphene Materials for Advanced Applications
Outline

Graphene has been heralded as a “wonder material” and is among a number of recently discovered carbon allotropes that demonstrate outstanding and versatile properties. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is a powerful and flexible technique for creating single- and multilayer-graphene and carbon nanotubes. These new materials exhibit a variety of unique and tuneable optical, electronic, mechanical, structural, thermal and chemical properties, offering the prospect of applications in photovoltaics, nanoelectronics, sensors, display technology, nanocomposites, simulated photosynthesis, batteries and supercapacitors. The aim of this project is to understand and optimise the CVD synthesis and graphene transfer/utilisation conditions on the final properties of graphene materials produced. This will involve examining the effect of substrate properties and processing conditions on the graphene material morphological and physical properties. The optimisation of these properties and parameters will lead to new materials with “super”-properties, making them suitable to fulfil a range of unmet industrial needs. Potential applications include super-strong fibres, supercapacitors and superconductors.

Eligibility

Minimum BSc First class honours in Materials Science, Chemical Engineering or Chemistry

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Synthesis of Biologically Active Indolizidine and Pyrrolizidine Natural Products
Outline

This research will be in the area of synthetic organic chemistry and will focus specifically on the synthesis of heterocyclic natural products. The targets of this project are the indolizidine and pyrrolizidine alkaloids. These systems are of interest in the possible treatment of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and viral infections such as AIDS, and some of them have the potential to function as potent analgesics or as potential treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders. Examples of such compounds include the well-known "poison frog alkaloids".

Eligibility

A minimum of a BSc 2.1 honours degree in Chemistry

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Synthesis of Novel Compounds for the Treatment of Cancer
Outline

We are involved in research programmes with cancer biologists that require the preparation of novel molecules for testing. This includes the development of synthetic methodology to prepare potential drugs containing fluorescent tags and antibody conjugates.

Eligibility

First or Upper Second class honours degree (or overseas equivalent) in Chemistry or a closely related subject.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £xx per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Synthesis of Novel Silicon-Containing Heterocycles
Outline

Silicon is the second most abundant element on Earth however its synthetic chemistry has been little studied compared to its close neighbour carbon. The aim of this project is to develop new synthetic methods to access silicon heterocycles. These types of compounds are becoming of increasing interest in drug discovery.

Eligibility

First or Upper Second class honours degree (or overseas equivalent) in Chemistry or a closely related subject.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply
Use of Physical Organic Chemistry to study reaction mechanisms
Outline

The mechanisms of a large number of reactions that are undertaken each day, in both academic and industrial laboratories, are not fully understood. In this project a student will be trained in the use of the techniques of physical organic chemistry in order to explore the mechanisms of industrially relevant reactions. The work will focus on the development of processes for the synthesis of oligonucleotides.

Eligibility

The normal level of attainment required for entry is: • a Master's degree from a UK University or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or • an upper second class honours degree (2:1) from a UK university in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed, or • appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £5,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

How to apply

All major areas of chemistry are covered with areas of strength including: • synthetic organic chemistry • physical organic chemistry • carbohydrates, proteins and enzyme chemistry • organometallic and supramolecular chemistry • heterogeneous catalysis and adsorption • thermal methods of analysis and synthesis • materials chemistry

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts' which features profiles of all our academic staff.

You will need to complete a research proposal outlining your areas of interest and when this is submitted along with your research degree application form we will look for the academics within the University who have the expertise and knowledge to supervise you and guide you through your research degree.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes to aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

How much will it cost me?

In 2017/18, the full-time tuition fee for UK and EU postgraduate research students at the University of Huddersfield is £4,165 (see Fees and Finance for exceptions).

Tuition fees will cover the cost of your study at the University as well as charges for registration, tuition, supervision and examinations. For more information about funding, fees and finance for UK/EU students, including what your tuition fee covers, please see Fees and Finance. Please note that tuition fees for subsequent years of study may rise in line with inflation (RPI-X).

If you are interested in studying with us on a part-time basis, please visit our Fees and Finance pages for part-time fee information.

If you are an international student coming to study at the University of Huddersfield, please visit the International Fees and Finance pages for full details of tuition fees and support available.

Please email the Student Finance Office or call 01484 472210 for more information about fees and finance.

Scholarships

Please visit our webpages to check if you are eligible for the Vice ChancellorÂ’s Scholarship for University of Huddersfield graduates.

The University offers a limited number of full and partial fee waivers. If you wish to be considered for a scholarship, please read through the scholarship guidance and include the name of the scholarship on your online application.

Additional Programme costs

Additional programme costs (sometimes known as bench fees) may be charged for research degrees in which there are exceptional costs directly related to the research project. For some subject areas, such as Science and Engineering, these costs could range from £3,000 - £16,000 per year, dependent upon the research project. If you wish to know if these costs will apply to the course you’re interested in, please email the Admissions and Records Office who will direct your query to the relevant department.

Examples of exceptional costs include:

  • Equipment maintenance costs
  • Equipment hire
  • Access costs to specialised equipment
  • Patient/volunteer expenses
  • Tissue/cell culture
  • Special reagents/materials
  • Purchase of laboratory consumables
  • Purchases of additional special permanent laboratory equipment
  • Photography and film processing
  • Video tape filming, recording, CD archiving
  • Specialised computation
  • Travelling costs - where this is integral to the research, it would not normally cover conference attendance except in special circumstances
  • Access to specialist facilities/resources
  • Special statistical packages
  • Access to special databases
  • Data collection costs (eg. postage, envelops and stationary, questionnaire administration)
  • Interview translation and transcription costs.

International

All Postgraduate research students who do not have specific timetabled teaching sessions are required to maintain regular engagement with the University under the Attendance Monitoring Policy.

Information for overseas students with a Tier 4 visa: The University also requires that all overseas students with a Tier 4 visa comply with the requirements set out below:

•  Students are expected to remain in the UK at the address notified to the University until the official end of the academic year.

•  Students are expected to be able to demonstrate, to the University's reasonable satisfaction, that their domestic living arrangements, including their residential location, are conducive to their full engagement with their studies and to their ability to comply with Home Office and University attendance requirements for full time students.

How to apply

To make a formal application, complete the online application form.

This normally includes the submission of a research proposal. Read through the proposal guidelines first to make sure you cover all the information needed, and ensure you include the proposal (if required) when submitting your online application. You can check whether the degree you are applying for requires a proposal by checking the specific course entries.

If you wish to be considered for a scholarship, please read through the scholarship guidance and include the name of the scholarship on your online application.

Applications are assessed based upon academic excellence, other relevant experience and how closely the research proposal aligns with Huddersfield's key research areas.

Research community

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Research programme

Individuals working towards the award of PhD are required to successfully complete a programme resulting in a significant contribution to knowledge.

You are expected to work to an approved programme of work including appropriate programmes of postgraduate study (which may be drawn from parts of existing postgraduate courses, final year degree programmes, conferences, seminars, masterclasses, guided reading or a combination of study methods).

Research skills training

The University of Huddersfield has an exciting and comprehensive Researcher Skills Development Programme available to all postgraduate researchers. The Researcher Skills Development Programme supports our researchers to broaden their knowledge, allowing them to access tools and skills which can significantly improve employability, whether in academia or industry. It's important to develop transferable personal and professional skills alongside the research skills and techniques necessary for your postgraduate study and research. The programme is also mapped onto Vitae's Researcher Development Framework (RDF), allowing researchers at the University of Huddersfield to benefit from Vitae support as well as our own Programme.

We offer skills training through a programme designed to take advantage of technology platforms as well as face-to-face workshops and courses. The University has subscribed to Epigeum, a programme of on-line research training support designed and managed by staff at Imperial College London which will be accessed via UniLearn, the University's Virtual Learning Environment.

Research supervision

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members. The research supervisor will advise and support you on your project.


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